america-wakiewakie:

america-wakiewakie:
Five Rebuttals for the Riot Shamers by Tyler Reinhard | Mask Magazine

1. “THIS DISTRACTS FROM THE MESSAGE.”
No it doesn’t. If you think this is a distraction, take a deep breath and focus. It’s not “about one person”. It’s about fearing the loss of your family and friends at the hands of police. It could happen at any moment, and Michael Brown’s murder reminds us of this. He was quite literally supposed to start college today. It’s possible to have compassion and sympathy for the bereaved and still act out against the systematic exploitation of communities of color. If you can’t do these two things at once, it’s time to examine your commitment to a world without this terrifying syncopation of police violence and economic starvation.
As for distracting the media, well … Attempting to appeal for mainstream media visibility in this age of instant information is a pathetic neutralization of our capacity. Let them cover the sensation if that’s what they’ll do. Our resentment should not be engineered by their attention span.
2. “DESTROYING ‘YOUR OWN NEIGHBORHOOD’ WON’T HELP.”
I’m not sure how people who make this argument imagine ‘owning’ a neighborhood works, but I’ll try to break it down: we don’t own neighborhoods. Black businesses exist, it’s true. But the emancipation of impoverished communities is not measured in corner-store revenue. It’s not measured in minimum-wage jobs. And no, it’s especially not measured in how many black people are allowed to become police officers. Here is a local discussing WHY AREA BUSINESSES MIGHT HAVE BEEN TARGETED.
White flight really happened. Go LOOK IT UP. And insinuating that simply because all the white people left certain neighborhoods following desegregation doesn’t mean they are suddenly ‘ours’. This kind of de facto ‘self-determination’ is so short-sighted it makes me wonder how we can even talk about gentrification and segregation usefully if we think black people somehow ‘have all these neighborhoods’. We don’t have ghettos. Ghettos have us. Prisons have us. Sports teams own us. Record labels own us. We don’t have shit.
3. “LOOTERS AND VANDALS ARE CRIMINALS.”
I grew up afraid to put my hands in my pockets at the store. For us “can I help you find something?” means something very specific. Young people of color are presumed guilty. Police cars slow down when they pass us on the street. They search our pockets and dump out our bags. On our way to and from school. To and from work. If we walk through a wealthy neighborhood, we might get shot. A third of us have been to jail. The law protects this kind of targeting, so yeah, we’re criminals. We are criminals because we are seen as criminals. We were criminals long before we climbed through broken windows. We were criminals long before we ‘refused to disperse’.
4. “BLACK COMMUNITY LEADERS OPPOSE VIOLENCE.”
First of all, this is kind of a baseless generalization. One of Martin Luther King Jr.’s lesser known quotes ‘riot is the language of the unheard’ keeps me grounded here. In fact, did you know that MLK AND MANY OTHER NON-VIOLENT BLACK ACTIVISTS EMPLOYED ARMED GUARDS in the 60s?
Besides, all of this talk about ‘violence’ this and stereotypes that is just so unhelpful. Let’s maybe talk about the fact that in cases like this police deliberately censor footage gathered, in some cases ARRESTING PHOTOGRAPHERS for fear of sparking unrest. You know why that is? Because they understand what most riot shamers don’t: if you corner injured people, there is no where to go but against. Judging people’s commitment to ‘the cause’ based on whether they can bottle up their reasonable frustrations, and finding selective affinity with only those who can say from safe distance to ‘turn the other cheek’ is part of what sparks these riots in the first place.
5. “REFORM THE JUSTICE SYSTEM, DON’T RIOT.”
Something tells me people who make this argument haven’t really looked into the prospects of this task. Let’s be real, this ‘justice system’ people suppose is possible has been the subject of political and economic philosophy for hundreds of years. I got news for you: it’s not looking up. The ‘fair’ economic system that a reformed justice system would require is a myth.
“So are you saying we should just give up?” That’s what people ask me when I say things like this. My response: “eh, how about just not reducing everything to patience and progress?” Don’t ask kids to wait around and dodge bullets until the system treats us fairly. Just stop putting that on them. Believe it or not, you don’t have to save the world. And you sure as hell ain’t going to do it on Twitter. Just step back with the riot shaming, and work on your perspective.

america-wakiewakie:

america-wakiewakie:

Five Rebuttals for the Riot Shamers by Tyler Reinhard | Mask Magazine

1. “THIS DISTRACTS FROM THE MESSAGE.”

No it doesn’t. If you think this is a distraction, take a deep breath and focus. It’s not “about one person”. It’s about fearing the loss of your family and friends at the hands of police. It could happen at any moment, and Michael Brown’s murder reminds us of this. He was quite literally supposed to start college today. It’s possible to have compassion and sympathy for the bereaved and still act out against the systematic exploitation of communities of color. If you can’t do these two things at once, it’s time to examine your commitment to a world without this terrifying syncopation of police violence and economic starvation.

As for distracting the media, well … Attempting to appeal for mainstream media visibility in this age of instant information is a pathetic neutralization of our capacity. Let them cover the sensation if that’s what they’ll do. Our resentment should not be engineered by their attention span.

2. “DESTROYING ‘YOUR OWN NEIGHBORHOOD’ WON’T HELP.”

I’m not sure how people who make this argument imagine ‘owning’ a neighborhood works, but I’ll try to break it down: we don’t own neighborhoods. Black businesses exist, it’s true. But the emancipation of impoverished communities is not measured in corner-store revenue. It’s not measured in minimum-wage jobs. And no, it’s especially not measured in how many black people are allowed to become police officers. Here is a local discussing WHY AREA BUSINESSES MIGHT HAVE BEEN TARGETED.

White flight really happened. Go LOOK IT UP. And insinuating that simply because all the white people left certain neighborhoods following desegregation doesn’t mean they are suddenly ‘ours’. This kind of de facto ‘self-determination’ is so short-sighted it makes me wonder how we can even talk about gentrification and segregation usefully if we think black people somehow ‘have all these neighborhoods’. We don’t have ghettos. Ghettos have us. Prisons have us. Sports teams own us. Record labels own us. We don’t have shit.

3. “LOOTERS AND VANDALS ARE CRIMINALS.”

I grew up afraid to put my hands in my pockets at the store. For us “can I help you find something?” means something very specific. Young people of color are presumed guilty. Police cars slow down when they pass us on the street. They search our pockets and dump out our bags. On our way to and from school. To and from work. If we walk through a wealthy neighborhood, we might get shot. A third of us have been to jail. The law protects this kind of targeting, so yeah, we’re criminals. We are criminals because we are seen as criminals. We were criminals long before we climbed through broken windows. We were criminals long before we ‘refused to disperse’.

4. “BLACK COMMUNITY LEADERS OPPOSE VIOLENCE.”

First of all, this is kind of a baseless generalization. One of Martin Luther King Jr.’s lesser known quotes ‘riot is the language of the unheard’ keeps me grounded here. In fact, did you know that MLK AND MANY OTHER NON-VIOLENT BLACK ACTIVISTS EMPLOYED ARMED GUARDS in the 60s?

Besides, all of this talk about ‘violence’ this and stereotypes that is just so unhelpful. Let’s maybe talk about the fact that in cases like this police deliberately censor footage gathered, in some cases ARRESTING PHOTOGRAPHERS for fear of sparking unrest. You know why that is? Because they understand what most riot shamers don’t: if you corner injured people, there is no where to go but against. Judging people’s commitment to ‘the cause’ based on whether they can bottle up their reasonable frustrations, and finding selective affinity with only those who can say from safe distance to ‘turn the other cheek’ is part of what sparks these riots in the first place.

5. “REFORM THE JUSTICE SYSTEM, DON’T RIOT.”

Something tells me people who make this argument haven’t really looked into the prospects of this task. Let’s be real, this ‘justice system’ people suppose is possible has been the subject of political and economic philosophy for hundreds of years. I got news for you: it’s not looking up. The ‘fair’ economic system that a reformed justice system would require is a myth.

“So are you saying we should just give up?” That’s what people ask me when I say things like this. My response: “eh, how about just not reducing everything to patience and progress?” Don’t ask kids to wait around and dodge bullets until the system treats us fairly. Just stop putting that on them. Believe it or not, you don’t have to save the world. And you sure as hell ain’t going to do it on Twitter. Just step back with the riot shaming, and work on your perspective.

(via cognitivedissonance)

Nanu Nanu, Mr. Williams

politicalprof:

Nanu Nanu. RIP.

digital-femme:

The following comment added by a regular Gawker reader is of note:

Nothing involving black Americans is a national crisis unless it’s something that makes white people feel threatened, like mass protests against inequality. National crises involve citizens. And most white Americans don’t really view black Americans as full, legitimate citizens. They are an other. Also, the truth is, police brutality makes whites feel safe. Our culture paints blacks as inevitable criminal threats and police brutality makes whites feel as if those threats are being kept in line.

(via cognitivedissonance)

"Through all its various name changes — the War on Terror, the war on radical Islam, the war against Islamofascism, the Third World War, the long war, the generational war — the basic shape of the conflict has remained unchanged. It is limited by neither time nor space nor target. From a military perspective, these sprawling and amorphous traits make the War on Terror an unwinnable proposition. But from an economic perspective, they make it an unbeatable one: not a flash-in-the-pan war that could potentially be won but a new and permanent fixture in the global economic architecture."

— Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (via probablyasocialecologist)

(via cognitivedissonance)

"The US budget is like a 1st grader playing Oregon Trail. Spend all the money on ammunition so you can shoot at stuff, then wonder why your wagon is falling apart and everyone is dying of dysentery."

Malhavoc430 // Reddit (via mattchew03)

That’s it. That’s the whole government.

(via asgardian-feminist)

perfect.

(via coelasquid)

Nailed it.

(via aimee-b-loved)

(via think4yourself)

"…we need to stop talking about the economy in ways that make it seem like the weather. The economy is a result of the rules we create and the choices we make. The people who are struggling to make ends meet do so because we have built — through intentional choice — an economy that produces inadequate incomes for more than one-third of all Americans. So we need to have a real debate about what to do to build an economy that doesn’t produce such misery."

Deepak Bhargava (via azspot)

(via azspot)

Here’s how it works:

A Detroiter with an overdue water bill (that’s a requirement: the bill must be overdue) submits it, including their account number.

Their name remains anonymous.

Meanwhile, donors sign up too, telling the site how much they’re willing to give: $5, $100, whatever.

Tillman and her co-founder then manually break down overdue bills and spread them across several donors.

The donors then use the account number to pay their portion of a bill, get a confirmation email from the city, and voila.

The bill is paid. 

Tags: detroit water

"Polanyi’s core thesis is that there is no such thing as a free market; there never has been, nor can there ever be. Indeed he calls the very idea of an economy independent of government and political institutions a “stark utopia”—utopian because it is unrealizable, and the effort to bring it into being is doomed to fail and will inevitably produce dystopian consequences. While markets are necessary for any functioning economy, Polanyi argues that the attempt to create a market society is fundamentally threatening to human society and the common good. In the first instance the market is simply one of many different social institutions; the second represents the effort to subject not just real commodities (computers and widgets) to market principles but virtually all of what makes social life possible, including clean air and water, education, health care, personal, legal, and social security, and the right to earn a livelihood. When these public goods and social necessities (what Polanyi calls “fictitious commodities”) are treated as if they are commodities produced for sale on the market, rather than protected rights, our social world is endangered and major crises will ensue."

The free market is an impossible utopia (via azspot)

(via azspot)

"Large corporate capitalism is a breed apart from smaller scale capitalism. The former can often avoid marketplace verdicts through corporate welfare, strip owner-shareholders of power over the top company bosses and offload the cost of their pollution, tax escapes and other “externalities” onto the backs of innocent people. Always evolving to evade the theoretically touted disciplines of market competition, efficiency and productivity, corporate capitalism has been an innovative machine for oppression."

The Myths of Big Corporate Capitalism (via azspot)

(via azspot)

Tags: oligarchy

quasi-normalcy:

Capitalism loves science when it’s used to develop new technologies or new means of extracting resources.

Capitalism is indifferent to science when it works on things which can’t be directly commercialized.

Capitalism really hates science when it investigates environmental degradation, or when it points out that the economy is running headlong into a brick wall of resource limitation.

(via satanic-capitalist)